Regional Demography

Population growth is theorised to cease globally around 2100. Currently, the ending of growth is recognised only when it occurs at national level. Between 2015 and 2017, Natalie Jackson led a Royal Society of New Zealand Marsden project investigating the sub-national drivers of population change in New Zealand, and associated strategies to buffer or reduce the effects of depopulation on regions. The project's main findings are summarised in a Special Supplement of Policy Quarterly, vol 13.

Jackson, N.O. (2017). 'Introduction and Overview'. The ebbing of the human tide. What will it mean? Policy Quarterly Supplement 13: 3-9.


Pool, I. (2017). 'New Zealand's population and development path. Unravelling the 'when', 'how', and 'why''. The ebbing of the human tide. What will it mean? Policy Quarterly Supplement 13: 10-21.


Jackson, N.O. and Brabyn, L. (2017). 'The mechanisms of subnational population growth and decline in New Zealand 1976-2013'. The ebbing of the human tide. What will it mean? Policy Quarterly Supplement 13: 22-36.


Brabyn, L. (2017). 'Declining towns and rapidly growing cities in New Zealand: developing an empirically-based model that can inform policy'. The ebbing of the human tide. What will it mean? Policy Quarterly Supplement 13: 37-46.


Cochrane, W. and Pool, I. (2017). 'Maori in New Zealand's contemporary development'. The ebbing of the human tide. What will it mean? Policy Quarterly Supplement 13: 47-54.


Cameron, M.P. (2017). 'The relative (un)certainty of subnational population decline'. The ebbing of the human tide. What will it mean? Policy Quarterly Supplement 13: 55-60.


Cochrane, W., and Maré, D. (2017). 'Urban influence and popualtion change in New Zealand'. The ebbing of the human tide. What will it mean? Policy Quarterly Supplement 13: 61-71.


Jackson, N.O. and Brabyn, L. (2015). Towards a Social Atlas for New Zealand. Presentation to Pathways Conference ‘Diversity and Migration: Transforming our Cities and Regions’, Wellington. 23-24 July.


Jackson, N.O., Cameron, M.C. and Pool, I. (2015). The mechanisms of subnational depopulation – towards a typology. Presentation to the New Zealand Population Association Biennial Conference ‘Our People, Our Places’, Hamilton. 29-30 June.


Jackson, N.O. (2014). Tai timu tāngata - taihoa e? The ebbing of the human tide - what does it mean for the people? Presentation to Australian Population Association 17th Biennial Conference, Hobart, 3-5 December.


Pawar, S. & Jackson, N.O. (2014). Subnational depopulation and New Zealand's first demographic accounting model. Presentation to Australian Population Association 17th Biennial Conference, Hobart, 3rd December.


Pawar, S. and Jackson, N.O. (2014). Subnational depopulation and New Zealand's first demographic accounting model. Presentation to Regional Science Association International Conference, Christchurch, 2nd December.


Burdett, B. and Jackson, N.O. (2014). Growing liveable rural communities. TRAFINZ, Auckland, 17th September.


Jackson, N.O. & Wilde, P. (2008) The median income of Tasmania’s stayers and movers by labour force status at local government level, Report 14. Commissioned by the Demographic Change Advisory Council, Tasmanian Treasury, 1-76. http://www.dcac.tas.gov.au/.


Jackson, N.O. & Wilde, P. (2008) The family composition of Tasmania’s stayers and movers by major region, Report 15. Commissioned by the Demographic Change Advisory Council, Tasmanian Treasury: 1-39. http://www.dcac.tas.gov.au/.


Jackson, N.O. & Wilde, P. (2008) The characteristics of Tasmania’s movers and stayers. Overview Report. Key Insights and Executive Summaries, Report 16. Commissioned by the Demographic Change Advisory Council, Tasmanian Treasury, 1-51. http://www.dcac.tas.gov.au/.


Jackson, N.O. (2007) Which LGAs are oldest/ageing the fastest? Strategic Asset Management, Issue 209, AMQ International, February.


Jackson, N.O. (2004) Regional population ageing and local government funding. A tentative consideration of the issues. Australasian Journal of Regional Studies, 10 (1), 77-103.